wmagazine:

Live from Paris
Photograph by Adam Katz Sinding. 

wmagazine:

Live from Paris

Photograph by Adam Katz Sinding. 

nbchannibal:

MUST READ: ’Hannibal’: Meet the Chef Who Makes “Cannibal Cuisine” Look So Delicious

nbchannibal:

MUST READ: ’Hannibal’: Meet the Chef Who Makes “Cannibal Cuisine” Look So Delicious

minusmanhattan:

Advice From Lucien, a six-year old. 

The Possessive Apostrophe

thecharactercomma:

Other than contractions, we also use those silly apostrophes for showing possession. But there are weird rules about what to do when a word ends in s, or if it’s plural, or of the possessed noun of plural… So, let’s get that straightened out.

Singular Subjects:

At its most basic, the apostrophe is used like normal with a singular subject. This is true no matter how many kittens or bikes are owned.

The child’s shoe. (one child owns one shoe)

The child’s shoes. (one child owns many shoes)

The cat’s kittens. (one cat owns many kittens)

The cat’s kitten. (one cat owns one kitten)

But the big question! What if your singular subject ends in an “s”? The answer:

Technically correct: James’s bike.

Still generally accepted: James’ bike.

So, both are okay.

Plural subjects:

Instead of one child or one cat, what if something belongs to a group? Isn’t this the point where apostrophes go at the end? Well, sometimes.

When the plural form doesn’t end in “s,” things proceed as normal:

The children’s shoe. (many children own the same shoe)

The children’s shoes. (many children own many shoes)

The women’s magazine. (many women own the same magazine)

The women’s magazines. (many women own many magazines)

If the plural form does in in “s,” then you get fancy with your apostrophes:

The boys’ bike. (many boys own one bike)

The boys’ bikes. (many boys own many bikes)

The cats’ toy. (many cats own one toy)

The cats’ toys.  (many cats own many toys)

Ladies’ night.

Miscellaneous:

If you’ve got multiple subjects listed separately, the last name listed gets a normal  ’s, but only if both items belong to that person.

Alice and Audrey’s room. (they share the room)

Alice’s and Audrey’s rooms. (they have their own rooms)

Satine and James’s toys. (they share all the toys)

Satine’s and James’s toys. (they have their own separate toys)

If you’re talking about a family and referring to them by their last name, first make the last name plural. Then add the apostrophe.

Leona > Leonas > the Leonas’ house.

Jones > Joneses > the Joneses’ cars.

Roberts > Robertses > The Robertses’ dogs.

Hutton > Huttons > The Huttons’ patio.

But only use that when the family is owning something. “We are the Leonas” shouldn’t have any apostrophes.

Words that are already possessive don’t need any form of apostrophe.

Incorrect: Her book. It is her’s.

Correct: Her book. It is hers.

Incorrect: Your phone. It is your’s.

Correct: Your phone. It is yours.

Hope that helps! Resources: (x) (x)

—E

Em Dashes

thecharactercomma:

A lot of people use semi-colons wrong because they know there’s supposed to be a pause in their sentence that they know isn’t quite a comma, so they think it must be that mysterious semi-colon. Usually, it’s actually supposed to be an em dash (—), which in some ways is more mysterious!

The em dash is the longest of the three dashes and most often used for interruptions. Interruptions in speech, in action, in thought. It’s also a great syntax addition for fight scenes, since it makes the narrative seem quick and unexpected and jolting from side to side like a fight scene should be. Read your em dash sentences out loud until you get a feel for how its pause compares to the pause of a comma. It’s a heartbeat longer. If a comma is one beat of pause, then I see an em dash as two beats of pause.

In this first example, the em dash is used to give an aside to the reader. It’s like a btw sort of moment, which can sometimes be replaced with commas or parenthesis. I think the em dashes are most suitable when your aside is decently long.

Her neighbor, Frank, is always blasting music.

Her neighbor—the one who always blasts the music—is named Frank.

My mischievous neighbor, Vince, seemed to have a knack for graveyard cavorting.

Vince—more often called (in a raised and angry voice) Vincent Price Ramsey—seemed to have a knack for graveyard cavorting.

Next up, here’s the em dash as a replacement for the semi-colon. Kinda like a slang or shortened sentence. Semi-colons have to connect two independent clauses—meaning each side of the semi-colon could stand alone as its own complete sentence. If you don’t want to do that, try an em dash:

I thought hanging out would be great—a chance to finally see the city, just like Aunt Lillian wanted.

I thought hanging out would be great; it would be a chance to finally see the city, just like Aunt Lillian wanted.

There was a headstone hardly a foot from where I’d emerged—dark grey stone a few inches thick and maybe as high as my knee.

There was a headstone hardly a foot from where I’d emerged; it was made of dark grey stone a few inches thick and maybe as high as my knee.

Sometimes, you can use an em dash to have a speaker correct themselves, or interrupt themselves to amend their sentence.

I could see the blur of the graveyard behind him—through him—

Similar to the last example, it can be used to interrupt a sentence in order to add additional information about the sentence. Often you can use a comma in this situation, too, so try to think of syntax and how that additional beat of pause changes things. In this case, Alice has just seen a ghost for the first time, so her mind is a bit too shocked for the normal pause of a comma. Read both. Doesn’t the one with the em dash sound more shocked or surprised, while the comma makes it sound like a simple observation?

He was glowing pale—almost tinged in cold blue.

He was glowing pale, almost tinged in cold blue.

Of course, it could be an interruption. It could be someone interrupting another in speech, one action interrupting another, or a character’s thoughts interrupting themselves. Here I’ll include the sentence with the em dash and the sentence following, so you can see the thing interrupted and the interruption.

You can have an action interrupt a character’s thoughts. For the first one, Alice is in a creepy situation and completely focused on something else, so when something touches her elbow, she’s shocked out of her thoughts. For the second one, Tristan is listening for an enemy when the enemy makes a move and startles him into action.

As far as I could tell it was some kind of berry—

An icy contact on my elbow broke my resolve, and I screamed until an equally cold hand clamped over my mouth.

The night was still, and yet—

Something whistled through the air. Tristan jerked backwards, narrowly avoiding an incoming dagger.

Here we have one character interrupting another in dialogue. Pretty self-explanatory.

“I’m not going to—”

Mom’s voice in the receiver cut me off. “At least consider it.”

“After all, you’re only a—”

“If you even say girl,” I interrupted, “I’ll stab you, I swear.”

The next one is part of a fight scene, so Alice’s thoughts are interrupting themselves as soon as she thinks them. She throws up an idea, “iron,” but interrupts herself from further exploring that idea, and instead casts it out. In a fight, you don’t have time to think out long, eloquent ideas. Your thoughts should come in fragments. Stab. Punch. Dodge. Swing. Would this work? No. How about this? Maybe. The em dash can help get across this uneven jolting of thoughts.

Iron—no use. I’d dropped the knife when her damn vines ensnared me, and the nails were in my pockets and out of reach. Blood—there were possibilities there.

Continuing in fight scenes, em dashes can have action interrupt action. Don’t just throw them in willy nilly, but if you have a chance for an em dash, jump on it. Instead of a word like “suddenly,” it makes it feel suddenly. Ups the tension. Em dashes are about interruption, and what is a fight scene but two people interrupting each other’s attempts to kill the other? This is especially useful for the last line in a paragraph during a fighting scene, because it’s a nice place to have one action interrupt another.

I snatched it—slit across my hand—

And stabbed her through the heart.

His swords whistled through the air—

A clean “X” appeared on the imp’s back, severing its body into four neat chunks.

So yeah, I’m basically obsessed with em dashes and I use more of them than the majority of writers. (At 72k words, my current project has 22 semi-colons and 344 em dashes. So. Yeah. Not to mention the length of this post…) Em dashes are way cool and can add a lot to your writing even though they’re just another form of punctuation. Syntax helps your reader into the mindset you’re going for, and em dashes can be a great, powerful part of that syntax!

—E

wmagazine:

Denim Sisters
Photograph by Alasdair McLellan; styled by Jane How; W magazine October 2014. 

wmagazine:

Denim Sisters

Photograph by Alasdair McLellan; styled by Jane How; W magazine October 2014. 

powells:

Celebrate the freedom to read by changing your profile picture and letting the world know you read banned books!

powells:

Celebrate the freedom to read by changing your profile picture and letting the world know you read banned books!

ohhowlucky:

danteogodofsoup:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

standupcomedyblog:

John Mulaney | The Salt & Pepper Diner

THE BEST JOKE IN EXISTENCE

GOD I JUST TOLD SOMEONE ABOUT THIS STORY

This is one of the best pieces of comedy that I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing. I love this. I have been looking for this online for awhile.

Twenty some odd years ago in high school my brother and a friend spent the better part of two hours going around asking people at the pizza parlor if they had just one quarter, so they could play their favorite song. They wound up with enough for something like 13 songs. They queued up ~13 plays of Yellow Submarine and promptly left.

(Source: timetoputonashow)

Adam Lambert + Vines & Keek

(Source: lambertgifs)

wmagazine:

"I was way too scared to say I wanted to be an actor or a comedian." -Kristen Wiig
Photograph by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine October 2014.

wmagazine:

"I was way too scared to say I wanted to be an actor or a comedian." -Kristen Wiig

Photograph by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine October 2014.

“Do I contradict myself?
Very well then I contradict myself,
I am large, I contain multitudes.”
Walt Whitman (via theimperfectideal)

(Source: alexanderguns)

nbchannibal:

Murderers: (✿◡‿◡ฺ)

Murderers that cook: (✿ฺ◕ฺ‿ฺ◡ฺ)

Murderers that cook their victims: (✿ )ノ))。₀: *゚✲ฺβyё βyё✲゚ฺ*:₀

powells:

scholasticreadingclub:

macteenbooks:

When you buy another book even though you already have an unread one sitting on your book shelf. 

Happens all the time!

There’s a word for that! Tsundoku!   

powells:

scholasticreadingclub:

macteenbooks:

When you buy another book even though you already have an unread one sitting on your book shelf. 

Happens all the time!

There’s a word for that! Tsundoku!   

wmagazine:

Miss October: Kristen Wiig 
Photograph by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine October 2014.

wmagazine:

Miss October: Kristen Wiig 

Photograph by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine October 2014.